Availability: Άμεσα Διαθέσιμο

Psychodynamic Formulation: An Expanded Approach

ISBN: 9781119797265
Εκδόσεις:
Διαστάσεις 24 × 17 cm
Μορφή

Έντυπο

Εκδόσεις

Ημ. Έκδοσης

2022/09

Σελίδες

352

Έκδοση

1η έκδοση

Κύριος Συγγραφέας

51,00€(Περιλαμβάνεται ΦΠΑ 6%)

Διαθεσιμότητα: 23-28 ημέρες

Περιγραφή

Psychodynamic Formulation

A leading text for psychodynamic clinicians and practitioners

Psychodynamic Formulation: An Expanded Approach delivers an exceptional exploration of psychodynamic explanations and hypotheses that seek to explain how a person’s conscious and unconscious thoughts and feelings may have developed and may be causing or contributing to the challenges they face.

This latest edition of the leading reference includes a refreshed and reinvigorated emphasis on the impacts of culture and society, as well as the importance of diversity and inclusion, on psychodynamic formulation. It puts new focus on lived experience, including trauma, and on how clinical bias can contribute to the perpetuation of trauma.

In addition to newly included activities and exercises, readers will find:

A practical, step-by-step guide to collaboratively creating psychodynamic formulations
Comprehensive discussions about how what we’re born with and environmental influences contribute to development
Suggestions for using psychodynamic formulations in many clinical settings, including acute care and psychopharmacologic treatment
An educator’s guide to teaching psychodynamic formulation

Perfect for mental health practitioners with a professional or personal interest in psychodynamics/psychoanalysis, Psychodynamic Formulation: An Expanded Approach will earn a place in the libraries of trainees in all mental health fields.

About the Author

The Psychodynamic Formulation Collective is a group of psychiatrists and psychoanalysts who came together following George Floyd’s murder and nationwide protests against police brutality to address the historical neglect of sociocultural context in psychodynamic formulation, in particular the effect of social oppression.

Shirin Ali, an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at the Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons. A graduate of the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research, she enjoys teaching and supervising psychiatry residents in psychodynamic psychotherapy. In her clinical practice, she focuses on mood and anxiety disorders, psychosis, culture and identity, and emerging adulthood.

Deborah L. Cabaniss, a professor of clinical psychiatry at the Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, associate director of the Adult Psychiatry Residency Program in the Columbia University Department of Psychiatry, and a training and supervising analyst at the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. Her teaching and writing focus on psychotherapy education, and she practices psychiatry and psychoa-nalysis in New York City.

Sabrina Cherry, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University. She is also an associate director and training and supervising analyst at the Columbia Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research where she teaches candidates and conducts research on psychoanalytic career development. She practices psychotherapy and psychoanalysis in New York City.

Angela Coombs, an associate medical director at Alameda County Behavioral Health, where she focuses on increasing access to county mental health services and supports clients in East Oakland, California. Her scholarly work focuses on mental health inequities facing Black American populations and other minor-itized and/or marginalized groups.

Carolyn J. Douglas, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and an adjunct associate professor of clinical psychiatry at Weill-Cornell Medical College. She has been closely involved in psychiatric residency training throughout her career, has published several articles about teaching psychodynamic psychotherapy, and has won teaching awards from residents in psychiatry both at Columbia and at Weill-Cornell for her didactic courses and supervision in supportive psychody-namic psychotherapy.

Jack Drescher, a distinguished life fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a clinical professor of psychiatry at the Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons. He is also an adjunct professor at New York University’s Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis and a training and supervising analyst at the William Alanson White Institute.

Ruth Graver, an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at the Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons. She teaches and super-vises at the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Teaching and Research where she is currently the co-chair of the Columbia Academy for Psychoanalytic Educators (CAPE), a new program designed to hone skills rele-vant to treating and supervising candidates. Her scholarly interests include clini-cal technique, attachment theory, and psychoanalytic writing. She conducts her clinical practice of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis in New York City.

Sandra Park, a training and supervising analyst at the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research and an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Weill Cornell Medical Center. She has a private practice in Manhattan, and she teaches and supervises at Columbia and Cornell.

Aaron Reliford, vice chair for diversity, equity and inclusion and an associate clinical professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at New York University. He is also the training director of NYU’s Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship, and both the director of child and adolescent psychiatry and the associate medi-cal director of Behavioral Health Sunset Terrace Family Health Center of NYU Langone Brooklyn. Dr. Reliford’s clinical research interests include telepsychia-try, racial health disparities in pediatric mental health, cultural psychiatry, pedi-atric psychopharmacology, effects of early trauma on development of psychopathology, child parent psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, and dynamic/insight oriented psychotherapy.

Anna Schwartz, a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at the Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons. She is also a faculty mem-ber of the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research, where she has taught and supervised psychotherapy trainees for many years. She is in private practice in New York City.

Susan C. Vaughan, the Aaron R. Stern Professor of Psychodynamic Psychiatry at Cornell University. She also served as the Director of the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research from 2017 to 2022. She has special interest in LGBTQ issues and teaches about sexuality, gender, and the intersections between psychotherapy and neuroscience.

Περιεχόμενα

Preface x

Acknowledgments xiv

PART ONE Introduction to the Psychodynamic Formulation 1

1 What Is a Psychodynamic Formulation? 3

2 How Do We Create a Psychodynamic Formulation? 10

3 How Do We Use Psychodynamic Formulations? 14

4 Psychodynamic Formulation and Bias 18

5 Who We Are Affects Our Formulations 23

PART TWO DESCRIBE 29

6 Self 35

7 Relationships 44

8 Adapting 53

9 Cognition 62

10 Values 76

11 Work and Play 84

Putting It Together–DESCRIBE Problems And Patterns 93

PART THREE REVIEW 97

12 What We’re Born With 105

13 The Earliest Years 121

14 Middle Childhood 135

15 Later Childhood 143

16 Adolescence 149

17 Adulthood 155

Putting It Together–REVIEW a Life Story 161

PART FOUR LINK 165

18 Trauma 169

19 Early Cognitive and Emotional Difficulties 181

20 The Effects of Culture and Society 193

21 Conflict and Defense 205

22 Relationships with Others 214

23 The Development of the Self 225

24 Attachment 235

Putting It Together–LINK to Collaboratively

Create Psychodynamic Formulations 247

PART FIVE Psychodynamic Formulations in Clinical Practice 261

25 Psychodynamic Formulations in Acute Care Settings 263

26 Psychodynamic Formulations in Pharmacologic Treatment 273

27 Psychodynamic Formulations in Long-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy 282

28 Collaborative Formulations in Clinical Practice 291

End Note 298

Appendix A – An Educator’s Guide to Using Psychodynamic Formulation: An Expanded Approach 299

Appendix B – DESCRIBE, REVIEW, LINK–An Outline 305

Recommended Reading 307

Index 316